• Lara Shamieh
  • Lara Shamieh

    Assistant Professor

    Biomedical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology, Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Molecular Biology

    Regis College

    303.964.6585
    lshamieh@regis.edu

Professional Bio

Education

  • Ph.D.,  Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oregon Health and Science University, 2006
    Advisor, G. M. Clinton.  Dissertation Title: Receptor Binding Interactions of Herstatin and its Intron-Encoded Domain
  • B.S., Chemistry (Biochemistry) and Biology minor, University of Portland, 1999

Research & Scholarship

Research Interests

My primary area of research is the Biology of Aging. Aging is influenced by a complex interaction between genes and environment that isn’t yet fully understood. Many environmental factors such as lifestyle and diet are thought to have a significant role in the aging process. In addition, many molecular pathways that result in telomere shorting, apoptotic cell death, advanced glycation end-products, and protein misfolding/aggregation are all thought to play a role in the aging process as well. Despite many decades of study, however, the relative contribution of each of these processes to aging and how this translates into the multitude of aging-associated phenotypes seen in people remains largely unknown.

Many of the primary advances in our understanding of basic mechanisms of aging over the past several years have come from studies in invertebrate organisms. My research focuses on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Studies in C. elegans, and other invertebrate organisms have yielded many clues about aging mechanisms that are conserved across a multitude of organisms.

The best characterized conserved mechanism of longevity control is Dietary Restriction, the reduction of calories without malnutrition. DR has been observed to increase life span in a variety of organisms, including yeast, nematodes, flies, mice, and rats. Although it remains unclear whether DR also promotes longevity in humans, initial indications are that DR improves health and survival in primates. My current research focuses on using C. elegans to understand the genetic controls of DR.

Publications

Mehta, R., *Chandler-Brown, D., Ramos, F.J., Shamieh, L.S., and Kaeberlein, M. Regulation of mRNA Translation as a Conserved Mechanism of Longevity Control. Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Adv Exp Med Biol. 694:14-29 (2010).

The Role of TOR Signaling in Aging. Matt Kaeberlein and Lara S. Shamieh, Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
    Chapter in: “The Comparative Biology of Aging", Norman S. Wolf, editor.  Springer Publishers, Inc. 2010

Regulation of mRNA Translation as a Conserved Mechanism of Longevity Control. Mehta, R., *Chandler-Brown, D., Ramos, F.J., Shamieh, L.S., and Kaeberlein, M. Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    Chapter in: “Protein Metabolism and Homeostasis in Aging”, Nektarios Tavernarakis, editor. Landes Biosciences, 2010.

Stanfel, M.N., Shamieh, L.S., Kaeberlein, M., and Brian K. Kennedy. The TOR pathway comes of age. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1790(10): 1067-74 (2009).

Mehta, R., Steinkraus, K.A., Sutphin, G.L., Ramos, F.J., Shamieh, L.S., *Huh, A., *Davis, C., *Chandler-Brown, D., and Matt Kaeberlein.  Proteasomal regulation of the hypoxic response modulates aging in C. elegans. Science. 324(5931):1196-8 (2009).

Chatterji, A., Ochoa, W., Shamieh, L.S., Salakian, S.P., Wong, S.M., Clinton, G., Ghosh, P., Lin, T., and Johnson, J.E. Chemical conjugation of heterologous proteins on the surface of Cowpea mosaic virus. Bioconjug. Chem. 15(4): 807-13 (2004)

Shamieh, L.S., Evans, A.J., Denton, M.C., and Clinton, G.M. Receptor binding specificities of herstatin and its intron 8-encoded domain. FEBS Lett. 568(1-3): 163-6 (2004)

* = Undergraduate Student

Posters and Presentations

*Klum, S., *Schneider, H.S., Shamieh, L.S., and Kaeberlein, M. (2011) UV-Induced toxicity of ethosuximide, a known longevity compound. The Department of Pathology Annual Retreat. University of Washington.

*Grygotis, E., Kaeberlein, M., and Shamieh, L.S. (2011) Investigating the role of mediator protein MDT-15 on lifespan extension by dietary restriction. Amgen Research Forum. University of Washington.

*McCarthy, E., *Schneider, H.S., *Chandler-Brown, D., *Karnes, L.L., Shamieh, L.S. and Kaeberlein, M. (2011). UV-Induced toxicity of ethosuximide, a known longevity compound. Mary Gates Undergraduate Student Research Forum. University of Washington.

Shamieh, L.S., *Chandler-Brown, D., *McCarthy, E.M., *Karnes, L.L, and Kaeberlein, M. (2010) UV-Induced toxicity of ethosuximide, a known longevity compound. The Department of Pathology Annual Retreat. University of Washington.

*Chandler-Brown, D., Shamieh, L.S., *Karnes, L.L., and Kaeberlein, M. (2010) UV mediated toxicity of a known longevity compound. The Mary Gates Undergraduate Research Symposium. The University of Washington.

Shamieh, L.S., *Karnes, L.L., *Chandler-Brown, D., and Kaeberlein, M. (2009) UV mediated toxicity of a known longevity compound. The Department of Pathology Annual Retreat. The University of Washington.

*Chandler-Brown, D., Shamieh, L.S., Pendergrass, B.R., and Kaeberlein, M. (2009) Lifespan extension via reduced protein synthesis in C. elegans. The Mary Gates Undergraduate Research Symposium. The University of Washington.

Shamieh, L.S., Steinkraus, K.A., Pendergrass, B.R., McKay, V.L., Mehta, R., *Chandler-Brown, D., and Kaeberlein, M. (2008) Translation, degradation, and aging in C. elegans. The Department of Pathology Annual Retreat. The University of Washington.

Shamieh, L.S., Carroll, J.M., Clinton, G.M., and Roberts, C.T. (2005) Modulation of insulin-like growth factor signaling by an alternatively spliced product of the HER-2 gene. The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting

Carroll, J.M., Shamieh, L.S., Clinton, G.M., and Roberts, C.T. (2005) Herstatin regulation of insulin receptor expression and action. The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting.

Shamieh, L.S., Carroll, J.M., Roberts, C.T., and Clinton, G.M. (2005) Herstatin, an autoinhibitor of the erbB receptor family, modulates IGF-1-induced proliferation and survival signaling in MCF7 breast cancer cells. DoD Era of Hope Meeting.

Shamieh, L.S., Denton, M., and Clinton, G.M. (2003). The intron 8-encoded domain of herstatin encodes a receptor binding module that is required for erbB receptor inhibition. American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

Guo, S., Evans, A.J., Denton, M., Shamieh, L.S., Rhodes, J., and Clinton, G.M. (2002) Recombinant herstatin inhibits growth of carcinoma cells that overexpress HER-2 and the EGF receptor. American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

*= Undergraduate Student

Invited Presentations

Shamieh, L.S. “Why We Age: New Insights Into the Molecular Biology of Aging” Department of Biology Seminar Series, Concordia University, Portland, OR, 2011

Shamieh, L.S. “Eating Less to Live Longer? Insights Into Aging” Department of Biology Seminar Series, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA, 2011

Shamieh, L.S. “Why We Age: New Insights Into the Molecular Biology of Aging” bbb  and Biology Department Seminar, University of Portland, Portland, OR, 2010

Awards & Recognition

Patents and Technologies

  • IGF-1 as a Target of Herstatin (Dimercept) (Co-Inventor with Gail M. Clinton)
    Oregon Health & Science Technology #0829
    • US Patent # US-2005-0272637-A1, April 22, 2005Patent Cooperation Treaty (International), April 22, 2005
      Patent # WO 2005/112969
    • European Patent Convention, March 22, 2007
      Provisional Patent # 05779957.9
    • Provisional US Patent # 60/564,893, April 22, 2004
    • Provisional US Patent # 60/590,473, July 23, 2004
  • HER-4, HER-3, and DEGFR Binding Activity (Co-Inventor with Gail M. Clinton)
    Oregon Health & Science Technology #0802
    • Under review for Intellectual Property protection

Grants

  • National Institute of Aging Post-Doctoral Training Grant, 2006-2010
  • Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program Pre-Doctoral Training Fellowship, 2004-2005
    “Domain specific effects of herstatin, an alternative HER-2 (erbB-2) product on erbB-positive breast cancer”
  • National Institute of Health Reproductive Biology Pre-Doctoral Training Grant, 2001-2002