Summer Growth

Summer in Colorado is an energetic time, full of opportunities. Fulfill core or major requirements or investigate a new area of interest through Regis University's summer courses.

Mission of Summer Session

Inspired by the Jesuit vision of education, Regis College Summer Session is dedicated to the development of the whole person, the pursuit of academic excellence, the advancement of scholarship, the service of faith, and the promotion of justice.  Summer Session provides its students and the local community with outstanding and innovative educational experiences through on and off-campus programs.

Tuition Rates

Regis College Summer Session offers a reduced tuition rate. Tuition for Summer Session 2014 is $565 per credit hour.

Alumni may audit a course for a discounted rate of $100 per credit hour for classroom-based courses and $200 for online courses.

Scholarships and financial aid are available for summer session courses. Please see the Financial Aid & Scholarships tab for more information about financial assistance through Regis College.

Summer Session 2015 - Important Dates

On-Campus Courses

 

Eight Week Online Courses

 

Sixteen Week Courses

 

Session 3W1

 

Session 3W2

 

Session 3W3

 

Session 6W1

 

Session SUV

 

Session SEM

 

First Day of Online Registration for Courses and Summer Housing

 

March  31

 

March 31

 

March 31

 

March 31

 

March 31

 

March 31

 

First Day of In-Person and Mail-In Registration

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

Summer Session Scholarship Application Due

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

April 7

 

Last Day to Register for Summer Housing

 

April 14

 

April 14

 

April 14

 

April 14

 

April 14

 

April 14

 

Tuition Due

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

Session Begins

 

May 4

 

May 26

 

June 15

 

May 26

 

May 4

 

May 4

 

Last Day of Registration, Add/Drop, Pass/Fail

 

May 6

 

May 28

 

June 18

 

June 2

 

May 11

 

May 11

 

Last Day to Withdraw

 

May 18

 

June 9

 

June 30

 

June 9

 

June 8

 

July 24

 

Session Ends

 

May 22

 

June 12

 

July 3

 

July 3

 

June 26

 

August 21

 

Memorial Day - No Class

 

N/A

 

May 25

 

N/A

 

May 25

 

May 25

 

May 25

 

Independence day - No Class

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

Student Responsibility

It is the responsibility of the student enrolling in Summer Session courses to read the Regis University Catalog. The information contained on this website is provided only as a ready reference, and in the case of any discrepancy the Regis University Catalog will prevail. All information, including course offerings, is subject to change without notice or obligation. It is the students’ responsibility to check their Regis University email in order to receive accurate information concerning the status of their course(s).

How and when can I register for Summer Session 2014?

Students are advised to register as early as possible in order to avoid enrollment caps on class sizes or cancellation due to low enrollment.

  • Online registration through WebAdvisor for current Regis College students will begin April 1, 2014. Directions for how to complete the online registration process may be found here
    • Special Incentive! Since this will be the first year we will be offering online registration to Regis College students, the first 178 student to register online will receive a $200 Award that may be used to defray the cost of attendance. Please see our “Financial Aid & Scholarships” page for more information.
  • Registration in person, by mail, or by email will begin April 8, 2014 through the end of add/drop for a particular session. The registration form may be found here.
    • Session 3W1 add/drop May 5
    • Session 3W2 add/drop May 27
    • Session 6W1 add/drop June 3
    • Sessions SUV and SEM add/drop May 12
  • Internships: Students intending to complete a summer internship are not allowed to register through the Summer Session course registration form or on the new online registration system. Please contact Melinda Taylor, Director of the Academic Internship Program, by phone at 303.964.5234 and/or by email at mtaylor004@regis.edu. More information concerning internship opportunities through Regis College may be found online at www.regis.edu/collegeinterns.

As a Regis College Student, will enrolling in summer session courses make me ineligible for the Regis Guarantee?

No. Summer Session courses do not interfere with your eligibility for the Regis Guarantee. For more information, visit our Regis Guarantee page.

Is there a limit to how many Summer Session courses I may take?

Students may not register for more than a total of 12 credit hours within a particular year’s Summer Session without the approval of the Regis College Assistant Dean.

I enrolled in a Summer Session course, but I now need to drop it. How do I do this?

Please check the add/drop deadline for your course to confirm you are eligible. [Please check the important dates under the overview tab].
If you still are within the add/drop window for your course, contact Academic Records & Registration to complete the process. They may be reached by:

Email: registrar@regis.edu
Phone: 303.458.4126 or 1.800.568.8932 (6 a.m.to 10 p.m., Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday)
In-person: 4th Floor Main Hall

I enrolled in a Summer Session course, but I now need to withdraw from it. How do I do this?

Please check both the add/drop and withdraw deadlines for your course confirm that add/drop has closed for your course and you are still within the timeframe that will permit you to withdraw from a course. [Please check the important dates under the overview tab].

If you are within the withdraw period and are on-campus taking a course please pick up the triplicate form outside the Academic Dean’s Office, Loyola Hall 16.

If you are taking an online course or completing an out-of-state internship, please email your request to sprochaz@regis.edu or ldesisto@regis.edu to have the withdraw process completed.

***Important Note: Withdrawing from a course could result in some or all of tuition still being owed. If you decide to withdraw from a course, please complete this process as promptly as possible.

Is it possible to audit a Summer Session course?

Yes, students are permitted to audit for the purpose of personal enrichment and exploration with written permission from the Regis College Assistant Dean. Students auditing a course are expected to participate in the course, maintain normal attendance, and complete course assignments, although they are exempt from assigned tests. Those students will receive an “AU” grade with no credit earned and will be charged the regular tuition rate. Exercising the audit option must be completed by the Add/Drop deadline.

I am on Academic Probation through Regis College, may I take courses during Summer Session?

Regis College students on academic probation may register for one course per session for a maximum of six credit hours. If a student is placed on academic probation after registering for summer courses, the Assistant Dean will contact the student to arrange a drop for any extraneous course(s).

I am not a Regis College Student, may I register?

Yes! The Summer Session Registration Form may be found here. Please contact us for additional instructions; we are happy to help you via phone or email.

  • Regis University Alumni who would like to audit a summer session course may do so at a reduced tuition rate of $100 to audit a classroom-based course and $200 to audit an online course. The course may not be audited if it is at capacity. We must receive the Alumni Audit request 2 weeks prior to the start of the summer session term in which the course will be offered. More information on this opportunity, including information on how to look up a class, can be found on their webpage.
  • Non-Regis Students who attend another college or university and wish to take summer classes without intending to work toward a degree at Regis may enroll as a summer student. While it is not necessary to file their school’s transcript with Regis University to attend Summer Session, it is advisable that they secure approval from their institution to register for Regis College Summer Session.
  • Non-Regis Students who wish to enroll at Regis University as a degree-seeking students should contact the Office of Admissions at 303.964.4900 or RUAdmissions@regis.edu.
  • Non-Degree Seeking Students wishing to further their education may enroll as summer students. Students wishing to pursue this option must create a user account through the Admissions Office.
  • High School Students may enroll in a Regis summer class with the approval of the instructor and the Regis College Assistant Dean. A written recommendation is required from their principal or a high school faculty member in the academic discipline of the summer course in which they wish to enroll.

Is it possible to have access to on-campus housing during summer session?

  • On-campus housing is available to undergraduate students enrolled in Regis College or Rueckert-Hartman College for Health Professions. Availability is limited.
  • Housing Rates for Summer Session 2014. A week runs from Sunday morning to Saturday night. Housing fees will be placed on the student’s account to be paid.
    • Double Room: $200 per week or any portion of a week
    • Single Room: $250 per week or any portion of a week
  • More information regarding summer housing can be found online. Students may apply for housing from March 19-April 16. Students must be enrolled in a summer course to stay on campus during the summer.
  • Students with additional questions should contact the Office of Residence Life, Housing and Event Services at 303.458.4991 or by email at reslife@regis.edu.

What student services are available during summer session?

  • Learning Commons: Writing Center and Tutoring Services
    • The Learning Commons provides free academic support services during the summer semester. Writing Consultants can meet with clients online or in person and offer assistance on any aspect of the writing process, ranging from brainstorming to revising. Tutoring Services will be available in a variety of subjects. To learn more about out offerings and to schedule an appointment, visit our homepage.
  • Student Disability Services
  • Library 
  • Dining: On campus dining services are available during limited hours in the summer. Please visit their webpage for additional information.
  • Lowell Campus Bookstore summer hours:
    • Monday – Thursday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m
    • Friday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
    • Closed Saturday and Sunday
  • Fitness Center summer hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. (Subject to Change)
  • Counseling and Personal Development office hours: Monday - Friday: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; Phone: 303.458.3507
  • Student Health Services summer hours:

    • Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; closed for lunch from 1-2 p.m.
    • Availability is subject to change and will be posted on the office door.

Schedule Changes

Please note that Regis University reserves the right to cancel any course that does not draw adequate registration and to set maximum limits for enrollment in certain classes. Two weeks before the start of each summer term, classes that have not met their enrollment requirements will be evaluated for cancellation.

Session 3W1: May 4 - May 22, 2015

Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
BA 407 Leadership Principles 3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Bauman, D
BA 430
Business Finance
3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Conley, A
COM 210 Speech Communication 3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Hill, J
COM 464H Film Criticism: Documentaries 3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Hill, J
EN 250
Literature Matters
3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Dimovitz, S
PE 420 Outdoor Recreational Leadership 3 M-T 9:00am-1:00pm Williams,N
PL 448N/PJ495R


RCC 420J
Drugs and Society


Justice and the Common Good: Drugs and Society
3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Gosselin, A
POL 281
Introduction to Political Philosophy
3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Wessner, D
PY 250
General Psychology
3 M-TR 9:00am-1:00pm Basham, M
RCC 400D
Diversity and Culture: Learning Disabilities and Developmental Differences
3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Betjemann, R
RCC 400D


WGS 410I
Diversity and Culture: Race and Gender in American Culture


Race and Gender in American Culture
3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Narcisi, L
SP 209A Elementary Spanish I 4 M-F 8:30am-12:30pm Carrion, G
SP 209A Elementary Spanish I 4 M-F 8:30am-12:30pm Woods, C
SP 423 Translation/Interpretation/Composition 3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Medina, E
SP 424 Spanish for the Medical and Health Care Worker 3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Medina, E

Session 3W2: May 26 - June 12, 2015

Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
EN 353 British Literature Survey to 1789
3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Myklebust, N
RCC 400D Diversity and Culture:  Comedy, Diversity, Community and Dialogue
3 M-F TBA Goodwin, J
SP 209B Elementary Spanish II 4 M-F 8:30am-12:30pm Palacios, L
SP 209B Elementary Spanish II 4 M-F 8:30am-12:30pm Bourg, C

Session 6W1: May 26 - July 3, 2015

Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
BL 276 Introduction to Human Physiology 3 TR 8:45am-12:30pm TBA
BL 277 Human Physiology Laboratory 1 TR 1:30pm-5:00pm TBA
CH 230 General Chemistry II 4 MWF 9:30am-12:50pm Sorauf, K 
CH 231 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 TR  1:30pm-5:00pm Sorauf, K 
NS 260 Introduction to Brain and Behavior 3 WF
8:45am-12:30pm Basham, M
NS 261
Introduction to Brain and Behavior Laboratory
1 WF 1:30pm-5:00pm Basham, M
PY 358
Lifespan of Human Development
3 TTH 8:00am-11:45am Lucas, K

Session 3W3: June 15 - July 3, 2015

Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
HS 232 World History
3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Sanders, E

Session SUV Online Courses: May 4 - June 26, 2015

Course Title Credits Instructor
AN 204

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

*4 week course (July 13-August 10, 2015)

3 Isik, D
MT 260
Pre-Calculus 3 Seibert, J
MT 270 Introduction to Statistics 3 Trenary, T
MT 272 Statistics for Life Sciences 3 Trenary, T
RT 201

Religion and the Human Quest

*6 week hybrid (May 4-June 12, 2015)

3 Conley, A
RT 302
Faith and Justice in World Christianity
3 Conley, A
RT 305 Belief and Unbelief 3 Conley, A

Session SEM: Travel Learning - Costa Rica, May 23-June 20, 2015

Travel Dates
May 23th - June 20th, 2015 (with pre and post meetings during spring and fall semesters)

Course Title Credits Instructor
BL 204G Introduction to Primate Behavior 3 Schreier, A
BL 205G Primate Behavior Laboratory 1 Schreier, A
BL 462 Primate Ecology and Behavior 3 Schreier, A
ENVS 462 Primate Ecology and Behavior 3 Schreier, A

Session SEM: Travel Learning - Colorado and Utah, May 4-June 1, 2015

On-Campus Sessions
May 4-14; May 29-June 1

Travel Dates
May 15-28, 2015

Course Title Credits Instructor
BL 204F Extreme Physiology: Adaptions to Environmental and Physical Challenge 3 Campisi, J
BL 205F Extreme Physiology: Adaptions to Environmental and Physical Challenge Laboratory 1 Campisi, J
BL 481W Extreme Physiological Adaptations 1-4 Campisi, J

Session SEM: Travel Learning - Spain, May 4-20, 2015

On-Campus Session: May 4-7

Travel Dates
May 8-20, 2015 (with pre and post meetings during spring and fall semesters)

Course Title Credits Instructor
RT 383E
The Pilgrimage of St. Ignatius Loyola
3 Geger, B
RT 493E The Way of St. Ignatius Loyola 1-4 Geger, B

Session SEM: Travel Learning - Kenya, May 4-June 28, 2015

Travel Dates
11 days in Kenya in late May/early June

Course Title Credits Instructor
BA/CS 282
Introduction to Information Systems
3 Litz, T

Session SEM: Travel Learning - Ft. Garland and the San Luis Valley, May 4-May 8 and June 8-19, 2015

On Campus Sessions: May 4-8; June 15-19

Travel Dates
June 8 -12th, 2015

Course Title Credits Instructor
HS 437 History of the American West-Old Stories, New Voices in the San Luis Valley 3 Gonzales, N

Session SEM: Summer Internships: May 4 – August 21, 2015

Summer internships are available in every major and minor. Juniors and seniors may do a summer internship for credit by enrolling in the appropriate 498 internship course. The minimum number of internship hours required is 120, but these must be spread over the entire summer semester (12-15 weeks). Generally, students work 10-15 hours per week at their internship site for most of the summer. Students must also complete all of their professor’s academic requirements.

Minimum GPA required: 2.5

Both the Director of the Academic Internship Program and the internship professor must approve the placement before the student can be registered for the 498 course. Registration takes place in Loyola 1 only. For more information about requirements and help finding a summer internship, visit the website (www.regis.edu/collegeinterns) or contact Melinda Taylor, mtaylor004@regis.edu.

Anthropology

AN 204 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of human life.  Includes the study of cultural practices such as language, myth, gender, marriage, and sexuality, and economic and political practices in different cultures of the world.  Cross listing: SO204

Biology

BL 204G Introduction to Primate Behavior (3)
Introduces students to scientific inquiry in context of a focused biological topic. Develops student knowledge of biological content and includes discussion of relevant societal and ethical issues. NOTE: This course has been approved to satisfy the core natural science with laboratory requirement when taken with BL 205E-W. Co requisite: BL 205E-W. NOTE: Course runs in Session SEM: May 5-August 22. Trip fee required.

BL 205G Primate Behavior Laboratory (1)

Introduces students to scientific inquiry through participation. Involves exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture content. NOTE: Course runs in Session SEM: May 5-August 22. Trip fee required.

BL 204F Extreme Physiology: Adaptions to Environmental and Physical Challenges (3)

This travel based course will expose the student, serving as both subject and investigator, to the majestic and diverse environments of Colorado and Utah, as they assesses cardiovascular, respiratory and psychological function and track their changes through a 29-day period of extreme environmental and physical challenges.  Accompanying instruction will explore the ongoing acute and chronic physiological adaptations to these conditions.  Co requisite: BL 205.   Trip fee required.

BL 205F Extreme Physiology: Adaptions to Environmental and Physical Challenges Laboratory (1)

This course involves laboratory exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture topics.  Co-requisite: BL 204.  Trip fee required

BL 276 Introduction to Human Physiology (3)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to human physiology, including neurophysiology, endocrinology, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal physiology. Prerequisite: High school chemistry or one semester of college chemistry or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: BL 277. Note: Required for Nursing or Pre-Physical Therapy students.

BL 277 Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory (1)
This course involves laboratory exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture topics. Co-requisite: BL 276.

BL 462 Primate and Ecology Behavior (3)

Explores the ecology and evolution of primates in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Emphasizes primate life history, behavior, social organization and conservation ecology. Prerequisite(s): BL 260 and BL 262. Cross listing: ENVS 462. NOTE: Course runs in Session SEM: May 5-August 22. Trip fee required.

BL 481W Extreme Physiological Adaptations (1-4)

This travel based course will expose the student, serving as both subject and investigator, to the majestic and diverse environments of Colorado and Utah, as they assesses cardiovascular, respiratory and psychological function and track their changes through a 29-day period of extreme environmental and physical challenges.  Accompanying instruction will explore the ongoing acute and chronic physiological adaptations to these conditions.  Trip Fee required.

Business

BA 282 Introduction to Information Systems (3)

Introduces information systems concepts, architectures, and technologies emphasizing information system resources needed to meet organizational mission and objectives. Trip Fee Required

BA 407 Leadership Principles (3)
Examines evolution of leadership from theoretical perspective with a focus on contemporary leadership. Topics include: management versus leadership, gender differences, power and social influence, ethics and values, culture and the key communication competencies of leadership. Requires students to evaluate and enhance personal leadership skills and develop a personal model of leadership. Prerequisite: BA 461.

BA 430 Business Finance (3)

Introduces major topics in managerial finance essential for understanding how financial managers acquire and manage a firm’s assets and how they finance these assets through debt and equity sources.  Prerequisite(s): BA 282, BA 250, AC 320A, and AC 320B and Junior standing.

Chemistry

CH 230 Principles of Chemistry II (4)
This course is a continuation of CH 210. Students will examine the following fundamental chemical principles: equilibrium theory; acid-based chemistry; chemical kinetics; thermodynamics; and electrochemistry. Additional special topics may include transition metal chemistry, the chemistry of new materials, nuclear chemistry, and geochemistry. Prerequisite: CH 210. Co-requisite: CH 231.

CH 231 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory (1)
This course is a continuation of fundamental lab techniques including chromatography, chemical synthesis, spectroscopy, and acid/base chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 211. Co-requisite: CH 230.

Communication

COM 210 Speech Communication (3)
This course provides an overview of the process of communication and introduces communication theory. Students will have practical training in the fundamentals of effective presentation for individuals in both public speaking and group communication settings. In addition, this course emphasizes discussion of contemporary issues and the analysis of public discourse.

COM 464H Film Criticism: Independent Film (3)
This course introduces the technical evolution and history of film and the principles of aesthetic criticism, film analysis and the evolution of themes and genres. Students will consider basic elements of cinema including screen writing, direction, casting, production, cinematography, and editing. Prerequisite: COM 380

English

EN250 Literature Matters (3)
This class introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama with an emphasis on works that have has a profound influence on our world. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay. Prerequisite: CCS 200 or RCC 200.

EN 353 British Literature Survey to 1789 (3)
Surveys significant works of British literature from the Old English period to the eighteenth century.  Examines representative authors, literary works, styles, and movements within a historical context.  Includes such authors as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Behn, and Johnson.  Prerequisite (s): RCC 200 and EN 210 or EN 250 NOTE:  English Majors only.

Environmental Studies

ENVS 462 Primate and Ecology Behavior (3)
Explores the ecology and evolution of primates in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Emphasizes primate life history, behavior, social organization and conservation ecology. Prerequisite(s): BL 260 and BL 262. Cross listing: BL 462.  Trip fee required.

Geology

GE 204E Geology of Colorado (3)
Colorado is an ideal location to study field geology.  The state’s geological formations and landforms, eastern plains, rugged mountains, volcanic areas of the southwest, and western deserts provide a diversity of environments unsurpassed by any other region in the world.  Colorado has more earth scientists per capita than anywhere on the planet, which  mean that the geology, landforms, hydrology, and soils of the state have been thoroughly studied and explored, resulting in a wealth of high-quality, Colorado-specific resources for students of the earth sciences.  Students in this course will use first-hand observation as the basis for analysis and discussion of the connections between the billion-year geologic history of Colorado and how humans have occupied the landscapes of the state.

This course has been approved to satisfy the core natural science with laboratory requirement when taken with GE 205. Trip Fee Required

GE 205F Geology of Colorado Laboratory (1)

Co-requisite: GE 204 

Trip Fee Required

History

HS 232 World History Since 1500 (3)

Traces the origins of an interdependent world through investigation of modern history in a global context.   Examines how Europe, relatively insignificant in 1500, came to dominate the globe by 1900.  Includes nationalism, decolonization, the Cold War, and then end of bipolarity.

HS 437 History of the American West: Old Stories, New Voices in the San Luis Valley (3)

This course will explore the social, cultural, political, and environmental history of the San Luis Valley, through a variety of methods.  During the first week, we will examine the history of the valley, in the context of the larger history of what would become the American West.  Trip fee required.

Mathematics

MT 260 Pre-Calculus (3)

Reviews the fundamental topics from Algebra and Trigonometry that are necessary for success in calculus.  Topics include graphs, polynomials, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponentials, logs, and vectors.  Prerequisite(s):  Placement by Department required.  Does not fulfill Core Math requirement.

MT 270 Introduction to Statistics (3)
This course presents standard topics in introductory statistics for students whose major is not mathematics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, and other topics. NOTE: Two years of High School Algebra required

MT 272 Statistics for Life Sciences (3)
This course presents introductory statistics emphasizing application in biology, psychology, neuroscience, and kinesiology. The course includes descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, regression, t-tests, Chi-square, and ANOVA with particular emphasis to analysis using p-scores. NOTE: Two years of High School Algebra required.

Neuroscience

NS 260 Introduction to Brain and Behavior (3)

Introduces the scientific study of how the brain relates to behavior.  Explores how brain structure are involved in sensorimotor functions, motivation and emotion, cognition, and neurological disorders.  Co-requisite: NS 261

NS 261 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Laboratory (1)
Introduces scientific methods used to study brain-behavior relationships such as sensorimotor, emotional, and cognitive functions as well as neurological disorders and the effects of drugs on behavior.  Co-requisite: NS 260

Peace and Justice

PJ 495R Drugs and Society (3)

This course explores the philosophical and justice issues around legal and illegal drug use, including personal identity, rationality and free will, excuses and punishment, social effect of drug use and distribution, and the correlation between drug use, mental illness and poverty. Prerequisite: RS 200 or RT 201

Philosophy

PL 448N Drugs and Society (3)
This course explores the philosophical and justice issues around legal and illegal drug use, including personal identity, rationality and free will, excuses and punishment, social effect of drug use and distribution, and the correlation between drug use, mental illness and poverty. Prerequisite: RS 200 or RT 201

Politics

POL 281 Introduction to Political Philosophy (3)

Introduces a variety of philosophies and alternative visions of social organization, politics, government, economics, peace, and justice.  Examines underlying assumptions, propositions, and potential implications of particular political attitudes, processes and policies.

Psychology

PY 250 General Psychology (3)
The course introduces the science of behavior and mental processes through a systematic study of representative areas of psychology.

PY 358 Lifespan Human Development (3)

Studies biological, psychological and social factors in human development from conception to later adulthood.  Prerequisite 250.  Recommended for Nursing majors.  Does not meet Psychology major Group A requirements.

Physical Education

PE 420 Outdoor Recreational Leadership (3)
This course includes instruction and practice of outdoor recreational and survival skills for the outdoor recreation enthusiast. Students will examine recreational facilities in terms of programming management and supervision. NOTE: Additional course fee and transportation required.

Regis College Core (RCC)

RCC 400D Diversity and Culture: Race and Gender in American Culture (3)

This course is designed to help students think in more complex ways about both race and gender in the U.S. through analysis of visual art, music, film, and literature. We will examine each cultural art form from African Americans, Latinas, American Indians, and Asian Americans. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required

RCC 400D Diversity and Culture: Learning Disabilities and Developmental Differences (3)

This course will focus on learning and developmental differences in children, including the topics of Dyslexia, ADHD, Down Syndrome, Autism, and mood disorders. Discussion will cover diagnosis, etiology, treatment, and policy implications, with a community-based component.

RCC 400D Diversity and Culture:  Comedy, Diversity, Community and Dialogue (3)

Comedy is complicated, its meanings often undecideable. Yet, the purposeful practices and applications of comedy constitute powerful ways to make visible experiences of diversity, stigma and injustice. Resembling theatre conservatory and festival learning models, Comedy, diversity, community and dialogue is part reading group, part community-based inquiry, part sketch comedy workshop, part ensemble performance, and part guided reflection. It is highly experiential and collaborative. Students must bring intellectual curiosity, an appreciation for the transformative capacity of serious play and shared laughter, a willingness to engage wholly in the demanding processes required and a desire co-create the conditions under which crucial conversations are likely to occur and to produce mutual understanding. The course is necessarily immersive. Some days will be long, and some evening and weekend writing, rehearsal and performance are required. Because the quality of ensemble work (and of the ensemble learning experience) is profoundly dependent upon the commitment of all members, students may not opt out of (or miss) any part of the course without prior notice and approval by the instructor. All Regis students able to participate as described, above, are welcome and encouraged.

RCC 420J Justice and the Common Good: Drugs and Society (3)
This course explores the philosophical and justice issues around legal and illegal drug use, including personal identity, rationality and free will, excuses and punishment, social effect of drug use and distribution, and the correlation between drug use, mental illness and poverty. Prerequisite: RS 200 or RT 201. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required

Religious Studies

RT 201 Religion and the Human Quest (3)
Considering human existence in relation to “the sacred” and drawing upon Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course explores religious perspectives on human question about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

RT 302 Faith and Justice in World Christianity (3)

Examines how the enculturation of Christianity in different times and places produces distinctive beliefs about Jesus and engages the pursuit of justice in the context of religious and cultural injustice.  Prerequisite(s): RT 201/RT 201C.

RT 305 Belief and Unbelief (3)
Explores questions of belief and doubt from Christian and secular perspectives, for example, regarding science, philosophy, and the experience of suffering. Prerequisite(s): RT 201/RT 201

RT 383E The Pilgrimage of St. Ignatius Loyola (3)

St. Ignatius made his spiritual pilgrimage on foot from Loyola to Manresa, Spain. During his time he wrote the "Spiritual Exercises". This course will retrace his pilgrimage route and experience historically and spiritually significant times. Trip fee required.

RT 493E The Way of St. Ignatius Loyola (1-4)
St. Ignatius made his spiritual pilgrimage on foot from Loyola to Manresa, Spain. During his time he wrote the "Spiritual Exercises". This course will retrace his pilgrimage route and experience historically and spiritually significant times. Trip fee required.

Spanish

SP 209A Elementary Spanish I (4)
This course provided a through grounding in essentials of grammar, oral drill, dictation, elementary and intermediate texts, conversation and written exercises.

SP 209B Elementary Spanish II (4)
This course is a continuation of SP 209A. Prerequisite: SP 209A or equivalent.

SP 423 Translation/Interpretation/Composition (3)
Offers practice in advanced composition. Translation, and stylistic analysis in Spanish to develop grammar, vocabulary, and analytic skills in a contemporary and realistic context. Prerequisite(s): SP 309B or equivalent.

SP 424 Spanish for Medical and Health Care Workers (3)
Provides Spanish students, medical and health care workers the opportunity to enhance communication skills with the vast number of Spanish speaking patients. Prerequisite(s): Two or more semesters of Spanish or permission of instructor. Majors and minors only.

Sociology

SO 204 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  (3)

Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of human life.  Includes the study of cultural practices such as language, myth, gender, marriage, and sexuality, and economic and political practices in different cultures of the world.  Cross listing: AN 204

Women and Gender Studies

WGS 410I Race and Gender in American Culture (3)
This course explores the intersection of homelessness, poverty, and gender. Community-based learning will help students understand the root causes of these issues, and they'll engage in local efforts to respond to homelessness in our community. Prerequisite(s): WGS 400 or RCC 200 or EN 320 and one 300-level English course.


Financial Aid

To be eligible to receive financial aid, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), available at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Submitting the FAFSA allows students to apply for federal, state and institutional grants, loans, student employment and scholarships. Additional information about financial aid is available at www.regis.edu/financialaid.

 

  • The 2015-2016 FAFSA applies to the Summer 2015, Fall 2015, and Spring 2016 semesters. Students are encouraged to submit their FAFSA between Jan. 1 and March 1 for maximum consideration for grants and scholarships, but FAFSA applications will be accepted until April 15th for students interested in financial aid assistance during the 2015-2016 academic year.
  • In order to make use of financial aid awards during Summer Session 2015, students must be enrolled in a minimum of 6 credit hours throughout the duration of Summer Session; however, if students are Pell and/or COF eligible, they may be able to enroll in fewer credits. Students should contact the Office of Financial Aid for advice concerning their particular financial aid needs and options
  • The Regis College Summer Financial Aid Application is due by May 1. The Summer Financial Aid Application form and deadline are separate from the Summer Session Scholarship Application. Students interested in applying for a Summer Session Scholarship will have to review and follow the directions associated with that program.

Scholarships

There are three kinds of scholarships available for Summer Session 2015:

 

High Financial Need: A number of 3 credit hour scholarships will be available to students enrolled in Summer Session with high financial need whose tuition cannot be covered by their current financial aid package.

 

  • Students must enroll in at least one 3 credit hour Summer Session course to remain eligible for this scholarship. The scholarship will be revoked from students who drop or withdraw from their Summer Session courses.
  • Completion of a FAFSA is required, as well as this scholarship form. In order to be considered for this scholarship, students must submit their FAFSA by March 1, 2015 and their Summer Session Scholarship Form by April 7, 2015.
Merit Scholarships: A number of 2 credit hour scholarships will be available to students enrolled in Summer Session who have a 3.2 cumulative GPA or higher and who actively embrace the Jesuit commitment to the question “How ought we to live?” through service and/or leadership to the Regis University community and surrounding areas.
  • Students must enroll in at least one 3 credit hour Summer Session course to remain eligible for this scholarship. The scholarship will be revoked from students who drop or withdraw from their Summer Session courses.
  • In order to be considered for this scholarship, students must submit their Summer Session Scholarship Form, along with the supplemental application materials, by April 7, 2015.
  • In a 250 word essay, students must address how they build upon the Undergraduate Core Educational Experience through work that embodies Regis College’s commitment to Ethical Inquiry and Reflection, a Concern for Justice, Global Awareness, and/or  Leadership in the Service of Others.
  • Students must also provide the names and contact information for 3 faculty members willing to serve as a reference.
Travel Learning Scholarships: A number of 2 credit hour scholarships will be available to students enrolled in a travel learning course.
  • Students must be an accepted member of a Summer Session 2015 Travel Learning course to be eligible for this scholarship. The scholarship will be revoked from students who drop or withdraw from their Travel Learning course.
  • In order to be considered for this scholarship, students must submit their Summer Session Scholarship Form, along with the supplemental application materials, by April 7, 2015.

    NOTE: Some Travel Learning programs will require an earlier deadline for this scholarship application. Please see the Travel Learning website (coming soon!) or contact the Assistant Dean for more information.
  • Recipients of this scholarship must agree to work with their faculty member(s) and the Assistant Dean to develop a plan for how they will share their academic and cultural experiences from their Travel Learning course with the wider Regis University community upon returning to campus.