Environmental Science student taking notes on the condition of lake water

Studying Environmental Science at Regis

The environmental science program at Regis emphasizes the natural sciences in understanding the environment and environmental issues. This degree program is recommended for students considering careers or further education in wildlife management, environmental health, science secondary education, environmental biology, environmental engineering, or forestry.
Classroom

B.S. in Environmental Science

Degree Overview

The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science major emphasizes the natural sciences in understanding the environment and environmental issues. This degree program is recommended for students considering careers or further education in wildlife management, environmental health, science secondary education, environmental biology, environmental engineering, or forestry.  Students pursuing this degree are required to complete a companion major or minor in one of the following areas: Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Physics, or Secondary Education.

Program Requirements

Listed below are the required courses for completion of this degree at Regis University. Please note that recent course requirement updates may not be reflected in the list below and you should contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126 for recent changes and updates.

This degree program requires 128.00 credit hours for completion. Please contact your advisor or the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126.

Regis College: Core Requirements

Economics

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3-6 SH)
Take 1 of the following groups:
Group 1: EC 200 - Intro to the American Economy
Group 2: EC 320 - Principles of Macroeconomics
and
EC 330 - Principles of Microeconomics

EN 250 - Literature Matters

Introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama, with an emphasis on works that have had a profound influence on our world. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay.

Pre-requisite: TAKE RCC*200

Fine Arts

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(3SH)
Take three (3) semester hours of Fine Arts
from the following courses:
any 200-level FAC course, FAHS 211, FAHS 212

Foreign Language

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(6-8SH)
Take two classes in one language

Foundational

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(6 SH)
Take 1 of the following groups:
Group 1: RCC 200 - Writing Analytically (Fall)
Communicative Intensive (Spring)
Group 2: Commitment Program Students
RCC 200A - Writing Analytically A (Fall)
RCC 200B - Writing Analytically B (Spring)
Group 3: Honors Program Students
RCC 200H - Honors Writing Seminar (Fall)
RCC 300H - Honors Trad & Innovation (Spring)

History

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Three (3) credits from any 200-level History course

Integrative

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(12SH)
Take all of the following courses:
RCC 400D (Group 1), RCC 410E (Group 2),
RCC 420J (Group 3), RCC 430M (Group 4)

Mathematics

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(3-4SH)
Take one of the following Mathematics course:
MT 201, MT 204, MT 270, MT 270C, MT 272, MT 272C
MT 360A, MT 360B

Natural Science

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(4SH)
Take one Natural Science course (Group 1) with the
accompanying lab (Group 2).
Eligible courses include:
BL( 204/5E-W, 208/9, 216/17, 260/1, 262/3), ENVS 250/1,
GE 208/9, PH (202A, 205A, 304A, 305A),
AS 250/1 (Non-Science majors),
NS 260/1 (cannot be counted for Psychology Majors)

Philosophy

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(3SH)
Take one of the following Philosophy courses:
PL 270, PL 270C, PL 270H, PL 270P

Public Speaking

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Speech Communication

Religious Studies

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Any 300 level RT course

RT 201 - Religion and the Human Quest

Considering human existence in relation to the sacred and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course explores religious perspectives on human questions about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Cross listing(s): RT 201C.

Social Science

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Take three (3) semester hours from the following course list
ED 204, POL 215, POL 231, POL 241, PY 250, PY 250C, PY 250H,
SO 200, SO 200C, SO 203, AN/SO 204, PJ 200

RC: BS in Environmental Science- Lower Division

BL 260 - Principles of Bio: Molecular & Cellular

Introduces students to natural science, particularly the hypothesis testing and data analysis used in contemporary molecular and cellular biology. Develops student knowledge of the terms and concepts of cell biology, genetics and molecular biology. Highlights social and ethical issues. NOTE: Designed for Biology, Biochemistry, Environmental Studies, and Neuroscience majors, as well as for pre-medical and other pre-health-science students. This course has been approved to satisfy the core natural science with laboratory requirement when taken with BL 261 or BL 261H. Offered every Spring Semester. Corequisite(s): BL 261 or BL 261H.

BL 261 - Molecular/Cellular Biology Laboratory

Introduces students to scientific study design, primary literature, basic laboratory skills, data interpretation, and presentation of scientific results. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content and includes work with recombinant DNA. NOTE: One three-hour laboratory per week. Co-requisite(s): BL 260 except for students with AP high school credit for BL 260.

BL 262 - Principles of Biology: Organismic

Introduces students to natural science, particularly the hypothesis testing and data analysis used in contemporary organismic biology. Develops student knowledge of the terms and concepts of ecology, evolution, and biodiversity. Highlights social and ethical issues.

BL 263 - Organismic Biology Laboratory

Introduces students to scientific study design, primary literature, basic laboratory skills, data interpretation, and presentation of scientific results. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content. Includes dissection of representative organisms and fieldwork.

CH 210 - General Chemistry I

Introduces chemical and physical properties of matter, atomic structure, stoichiometry, periodicity, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, thermodynamics and aqueous chemistry.

CH 211 - General Chemistry I Lab

Introduces fundamental laboratory techniques including chromatography, chemical synthesis, spectroscopy and acid/base chemistry.

CH 230 - Principles of Chemistry II

Continuation of CH 210. Examines the following fundamental chemical principles: equilibrium theory; acid-based chemistry; chemical kinetics; thermodynamics; and electrochemistry. Additional special topics may include transition metal chemistry, the chemistry of new materials, nuclear chemistry, and geochemistry.

Pre-requisite: CH*210

CH 231 - Principles of Chemistry II Lab

A continuation of fundamental lab techniques including chromatography, chemical synthesis, spectroscopy, and acid/base chemistry.

Pre-requisite: CH*211

ENVS 250 - Introduction to Environmental Science

Explores the environment and its modification by human activity within a scientific context. Considers the chemical, geological, climatological, and biological bases of current environmental issues.

ENVS 251 - Environmental Science Laboratory

Involves laboratory and field exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture topics. May require a field trip outside of class time. NOTE: One three-hour laboratory per week.

GE 208 - Introduction to Geology

Introduces students to natural science through study of the Earth. Develops student knowledge of geology; notably Earth materials, Earth history, topography, tectonics, fossil fuels, groundwater, and soils. Highlights social and ethical issues.

GE 209 - Introduction to Geology Laboratory

Introduces students to scientific inquiry through participation in field and laboratory activities. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content.

MT 272/MT 272C

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Statistics for the Life Sciences

RC: BS in Environmental Science-Upper Division

Electives

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

Students must complete a minimum of nine (9) semester hours
of additional 400-level ENVS courses in consultation with
their academic advisor.
ENVS 498E-W is also recommended.

ENVS 402 - Principles of Ecology

Explores the interactions of organisms in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Examines the basic models and principles used in evolutionary, behavioral, population, community, and ecosystem ecology.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 BL*262 MT*272

Cross listing(s): BL 402.

ENVS 403 - Ecology Laboratory

Involves research design and the collection, evaluation, and statistical analysis of ecological data in the laboratory and in the field.

Pre-requisite: BL*261 BL*263 MT*272

Cross listing(s): BL 403.

ENVS 450 - Environmental Impact Assessment

Focuses on the theory and methods of creating environmental impact assessment reports. Explores various perspectives including ecology, chemistry, geology, economics, and environmental justice. This course is the capstone course for all environmental science and environmental studies students.

Pre-requisite: ENVS*250

ENVS 474 - Geographic Information Science

Explores the basic concepts, assumptions, theories, and structures of geographic information systems (GIS). Covers GIS methods through hands on activities using up-to-date software. Emphasizes applications of GIS for the spatial analysis of environmental issues. NOTE: Completion of natural science core requirement or permission of instructor required.

ENVS 495A - Portfolio Development I

Explores the expected program outcomes for a major in ENVS. Focuses on the first steps in assembling an academic portfolio to demonstrate attainment of program outcomes. NOTE: Senior standing required.

Pre-requisite: TAKE ENVS*250;

ENVS 495B - Portfolio Development II

Involves completion and assessment of an academic portfolio. NOTE: Majors only.

Pre-requisite: TAKE ENVS*250;

Course Descriptions

Listed below are the available courses offered at Regis University within this respective degree program. The courses below include the degree program requirements as well as subject related courses. Please contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126 for recent changes and updates.

BL 260 Principles of Bio: Molecular & Cellular (3.00)

Introduces students to natural science, particularly the hypothesis testing and data analysis used in contemporary molecular and cellular biology. Develops student knowledge of the terms and concepts of cell biology, genetics and molecular biology. Highlights social and ethical issues. NOTE: Designed for Biology, Biochemistry, Environmental Studies, and Neuroscience majors, as well as for pre-medical and other pre-health-science students. This course has been approved to satisfy the core natural science with laboratory requirement when taken with BL 261 or BL 261H. Offered every Spring Semester. Corequisite(s): BL 261 or BL 261H.

BL 261 Molecular/Cellular Biology Laboratory (1.00)

Introduces students to scientific study design, primary literature, basic laboratory skills, data interpretation, and presentation of scientific results. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content and includes work with recombinant DNA. NOTE: One three-hour laboratory per week. Co-requisite(s): BL 260 except for students with AP high school credit for BL 260.

BL 261H Honors Molecular/Cellular Bio Lab/Sem (2.00)

Introduces students to scientific study design, primary literature, basic laboratory skills, data interpretation, and presentation of scientific results. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content and includes work with recombinant DNA. Seminar readings explore topics in greater depth and link biological topics to broader academic themes. NOTE: Students with AP credit are not required to take BL 260 as a co-requisite. One three-hour laboratory and one seminar session per week. Honors students only or permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s): BL 260 except for students with AP high school credit for BL 260.

BL 262 Principles of Biology: Organismic (3.00)

Introduces students to natural science, particularly the hypothesis testing and data analysis used in contemporary organismic biology. Develops student knowledge of the terms and concepts of ecology, evolution, and biodiversity. Highlights social and ethical issues.

BL 263 Organismic Biology Laboratory (1.00)

Introduces students to scientific study design, primary literature, basic laboratory skills, data interpretation, and presentation of scientific results. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content. Includes dissection of representative organisms and fieldwork.

BL 263H Honors Organismic Bio Lab/Seminar (2.00)

Introduces students to scientific study design, primary literature, basic laboratory skills, data interpretation, and presentation of scientific results. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content. Includes dissection of representative organisms and fieldwork. Seminar explores broader academic themes.

CAS 411 Eco-Theology (3.00)

Explores contemporary environmental issues from the perspectives of different religious traditions. Compares spiritual and religious views of the environment, its meaning, and its relation to human beings. Explore scientific understandings of contemporary environmental issues, asking how religions engage these issues. NOTE: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

Cross listing(s): RT 401E ENVS 411.

CH 204 Drugs of Use and Abuse (3.00)

Provides an introductory survey of general, organic, and biological chemistry principles as they relate to prescribed, over-the-counter, and recreational drugs. Specific topics may vary each semester.

CH 205 Drugs of Use and Abuse Lab (1.00)

Involves laboratory exercises accompanying and reinforcing CH 204 lecture topics, including observations, demonstrations, and student experimentation.

CH 210 General Chemistry I (4.00)

Introduces chemical and physical properties of matter, atomic structure, stoichiometry, periodicity, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, thermodynamics and aqueous chemistry.

CH 211 General Chemistry I Lab (1.00)

Introduces fundamental laboratory techniques including chromatography, chemical synthesis, spectroscopy and acid/base chemistry.

CH 221 Honors Principles of Chemistry I Lab (1.00)

Inquiry based examination of fundamental chemical concepts in context of their impact on research, humanity and the environment using modern laboratory techniques and instrumentation. NOTE: Minimum score of 28 on the math ACT or permission of the instructor required.

CH 230 Principles of Chemistry II (4.00)

Continuation of CH 210. Examines the following fundamental chemical principles: equilibrium theory; acid-based chemistry; chemical kinetics; thermodynamics; and electrochemistry. Additional special topics may include transition metal chemistry, the chemistry of new materials, nuclear chemistry, and geochemistry.

Pre-requisite: CH*210

CH 231 Principles of Chemistry II Lab (1.00)

A continuation of fundamental lab techniques including chromatography, chemical synthesis, spectroscopy, and acid/base chemistry.

Pre-requisite: CH*211

ENVS 250 Introduction to Environmental Science (3.00)

Explores the environment and its modification by human activity within a scientific context. Considers the chemical, geological, climatological, and biological bases of current environmental issues.

ENVS 251 Environmental Science Laboratory (1.00)

Involves laboratory and field exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture topics. May require a field trip outside of class time. NOTE: One three-hour laboratory per week.

ENVS 402 Principles of Ecology (3.00)

Explores the interactions of organisms in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Examines the basic models and principles used in evolutionary, behavioral, population, community, and ecosystem ecology.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 BL*262 MT*272

Cross listing(s): BL 402.

ENVS 403 Ecology Laboratory (1.00)

Involves research design and the collection, evaluation, and statistical analysis of ecological data in the laboratory and in the field.

Pre-requisite: BL*261 BL*263 MT*272

Cross listing(s): BL 403.

ENVS 410 Aquatic and Fisheries Ecology (3.00)

Develops student knowledge of the ecology of freshwater and marine systems, emphasizing aquatic conservation and use of aquatic resources. Identifies aquatic resource issues and applications of perspectives to develop an integrative position.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 BL*262

Cross listing(s): BL 410.

ENVS 411 Eco-Theology (3.00)

Explores contemporary environmental issues from the perspectives of different religious traditions. Compares spiritual and religious views of the environment, its meaning, and its relation to human beings. Explores scientific understandings of contemporary environmental issues, asking how religions engage these issues. NOTE: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

Cross listing(s): CAS 411 RT 401E.

ENVS 414 Religion and the Environment (3.00)

Examines the interconnection between religion and the environment, including: the ways in which religion may be used to frame and discuss environmental issues; the contribution to environmental ethics made by religion; and the ways in which the environmental movement is shaped by and related to spiritualism.

Pre-requisite: RS*200

Cross listing(s): RC 425L RC 314.

ENVS 415 Environmental Ethics (3.00)

Examines the theories of value, justice, and gender and applies them to environmental problems such as sustainability, climate change, over-population, consumpton and waste, and wilderness protection, with the goal of developing ethical and political responses to these problems.

Cross listing(s): PL 448J WGS 485L PJ 473.

ENVS 416 Just & Sustainable Development (3.00)

Integrates knowledge of development practice and theory from the perspective of communities, states, and the global system. Builds on community-based models of just and sustainable development success. Interdisciplinary, drawing on health, environment, politics, business and law. NOTE: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

Pre-requisite: TAKE POL*231 POL*241 OR POL*281;

Cross listing(s): POL 406.

ENVS 417 Environmental Rhetoric (3.00)

Explores the values, needs, and persuasive strategies of various communities engaged in environmental debate, and includes guest speakers from across the Front Range, readings from multiple genres, and applied writing practice. NOTE: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

ENVS 418 Environmental Economics and Law (3.00)

Examines the economic, legal, and political systems that affect and regulate the use and conservation of the environment. Examines topics such as sustainable development and environmental regulation.

Pre-requisite: EC*200 OR EC*320

Cross listing(s): EC 418.

ENVS 419 Wilderness: Passion & Perseverence (3.00)

Introduces the philosophy, the literature, the legislation, and the current debate surrounding wilderness. Includes a mix of reading, discussion, writing, and a service learning project. Note: Junior standing or permission of instructor required.

ENVS 420 Environmental Politics (3.00)

Uses four case studies of environmental progress to drive analysis of local, regional, national, and global levels of dealing with change and conservation. Examines civil society, state and UN system approaches to building environmental norms that shape policy and legislation.

Pre-requisite: TAKE POL*231 POL*241 POL*281;

Cross listing(s): POL 420.

ENVS 421 Read Nature, Write the World (3.00)

Integrates different types of disciplinary thinking through reading and writing across the genres of poetry, fiction, nonfiction essay/memoir, and research-based position papers. The latter genre will require the student to demonstrate a degree of scientific literacy and the ability to reason quantitatively.

ENVS 425 Environmental & International Security (3.00)

Describes and evaluates environmental processes and conditions that affect contemporary and future international and human security. Examines causes, forms, and consequences of environmental scarcity and degradation.

Pre-requisite: TAKE POL*231 OR POL*241;

Cross listing(s): POL 451.

ENVS 428 Conservation Biology (3.00)

Introduces the fundamental principles of conservation biology including patterns of global biological diversity, biogeography, population genetics, extinction, restoration ecology, management, and conservation policy. NOTE: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 BL*262

Cross listing(s): BL 428.

ENVS 432 International Political Economy (3.00)

Analyzes the interactions and interrelationships between political and economics factors at the global level. Factors include monetary management, trade, multinational corporations, foreign aid, cartels and debt. Considers Western and North-South systems.

Pre-requisite: EC*200 OR EC*320

Cross listing(s): PJ 454 EC 432 POL 432.

ENVS 433 World History: An Ecological Perspct (3.00)

Focuses on the ecological, cultural, and civilizational regions of the world and their interactions from pre-history to 1600. Employs case studies and historical methodology.

Cross listing(s): HS 403.

ENVS 435 Advanced Field Ecology Laboratory (2.00)

Introduces students to methods of sampling and studying a variety of organisms in the field. Develops student ability to design, conduct, and appropriately interpret field ecological studies.

Pre-requisite: TAKE BL*403 OR ENVS*403;

Cross listing(s): BL 435.

ENVS 438 That's Garbage! Making Digital Stories (3.00)

Course explores the mysteries of garbage - its past and future, where it goes when you are done with it, the real people who deal with it, the human and environmental problems it causes, the untapped resource it is, and unique solutions for creating a world with less waste. Students will explore ideas through books, blogs, websites, field trips, self-reflection, interviews, and discussions, then analyze and distill that information to write great stories and to craft a series of your own digital stories for the public. Students will produce non-fiction digital video stories for personal reflection, research, and social change.

ENVS 440 Environment and Culture (3.00)

Provides an introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment focusing on how social categories such as race, gender and class shape the way humans interact with the natural environment and react to environmental degradation.

ENVS 441 Sustainable Communities (3.00)

Explores social, environmental, and economic issues that prevent and encourage more sustainable communities. Topics include transportation, sprawl, poverty, urban/wildlife interface, housing, population, consumption, municipal/toxic waste, community resources and empowerment, and a variety of proposed solutions from around the world.

Pre-requisite: SO*200 OR SO*203

Cross listing(s): PJ 441 SO 441.

ENVS 445 Comparative Public Policy (3.00)

Provides a comparative examination of public policy in western industrialized nation-states emphasizing the interaction and interdependency of politics and economics. Evaluates basic issues of public policy including distribution, extraction and regulation focusing on identifying both the range of possible choices and the actual outcomes of adopted policies under a variety of circumstances.

Pre-requisite: EC*200 OR EC*320

Cross listing(s): EC 445 POL 445 PJ 446.

ENVS 448 Plant Diversity and Ecology (3.00)

Surveys plant systematics and distributional aspects of plant community ecology. Emphasizes identification, classification, biogeography, and environmental effects on plant distribution and community structure. Focuses on the Colorado flora. NOTE: One or two weekend field trips required.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 AND BL*262

Cross listing(s): BL 448.

ENVS 450 Environmental Impact Assessment (3.00)

Focuses on the theory and methods of creating environmental impact assessment reports. Explores various perspectives including ecology, chemistry, geology, economics, and environmental justice. This course is the capstone course for all environmental science and environmental studies students.

Pre-requisite: ENVS*250

ENVS 455 Modelling Sustainability (3.00)

Sustainability can be defined in many different ways. This course explores the concept of sustainability and ask why it matters. Investigate the myriad of ways that services, products, business, institutions, and people can improve their sustainability, and discusses why that matters in a global context.

ENVS 458 Animal Behavior and Behavioral Ecology (3.00)

Explores the mechanisms and functions of animal behavior with emphasis on the ecological and evolutionary bases of animal behavior. Some areas discussed include communication, reproductive behavior, and social behavior.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 AND BL*262

Cross listing(s): BL 458.

ENVS 459 Animal Behavior Laboratory (1.00)

Laboratory and field exercises accompany and reinforce lecture topics. Involves non-invasive work with live animals. .

Pre-requisite: BL*261 AND BL*263

Cross listing(s): BL 459.

ENVS 460 Forest & Landscape Ecology (3.00)

Investigates the unique ecological characteristics of forest ecosystems, surveys the diversity of world forests, and explores methods of analysis and management of forests at landscape scales.

Pre-requisite: TAKE BL*260 BL*262 AND MT*272;

Cross listing(s): BL 460.

ENVS 461 Western Ecology, Law, & Land Stewardship (3.00)

Investigates how ecology and laws have interacted to produce the specific ecology of the Western United States, particularly Colorado and Utah. Students will camp every night of the second two weeks of this course in the areas that will studied. Being in the field gives the student a unique opportunity to assess the ecological impacts of various land use laws.

ENVS 462 Primate Ecology and Behavior (3.00)

Explores the ecology and evolution of primates in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Emphasizes primate life history, behavior, social organization and conservation ecology.

Pre-requisite: TAKE BL*260 AND BL*262;

Cross listing(s): BL 462.

ENVS 470 Econ Dev in 3rd/4th Worlds (3.00)

Studies various models/theories of economic development that traces a history of underdevelopment in the third and fourth worlds. Investigates the various barriers and problem areas in developing countries. Assesses possibilities, prospects and policies of the future.

Pre-requisite: EC*320

Cross listing(s): BA 472 PJ 470 EC 470.

ENVS 472 Plant Physiological Ecology (3.00)

Explores the physiological responses of plants to their biotic and abiotic environments. Focuses on the physiological ecology of Colorado flora.

Pre-requisite: BL*206 BL*262

Cross listing(s): BL 472.

ENVS 473 Plant Physiology Ecology Lab (1.00)

Involves laboratories accompanying and reinforcing lecture topics. NOTE: One or two field trips on weekends required.

Pre-requisite: BL*261 BL*263

Cross listing(s): BL 473.

ENVS 476 Colorado Flora and Fauna (3.00)

Explores the range of ecological communities found in Colorado. Focuses on natural history and ecology of the plants, mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, and macroinvertebrates in Colorado.

Pre-requisite: BL*260 AND BL*262

Cross listing(s): BL 476.

ENVS 481E-W Special Topics in Env Studies (1.00 - 4.00)

Explores selected topics in environmentally focused topics not normally covered in regular course offerings.

ENVS 486 Oil & Water in the Greater Middle East (3.00)

Focuses on the history and effects of water use and fossil fuel extraction in the arid climate zone from North Africa to Pakistan.

Cross listing(s): PJ 488 HS 486.

ENVS 490E-W Indep Study in Env Studies: (1.00 - 3.00)

Offers an opportunity for advanced study in independent research projects in environmental studies.

ENVS 491 Research in Environmental Studies (1.00 - 3.00)

Offers and opportunity for laboratory or field research under faculty direction.

Pre-requisite: ENVS*250 ENVS*251

ENVS 495A Portfolio Development I (1.00)

Explores the expected program outcomes for a major in ENVS. Focuses on the first steps in assembling an academic portfolio to demonstrate attainment of program outcomes. NOTE: Senior standing required.

Pre-requisite: TAKE ENVS*250;

ENVS 495B Portfolio Development II (1.00)

Involves completion and assessment of an academic portfolio. NOTE: Majors only.

Pre-requisite: TAKE ENVS*250;

ENVS 498E-W Internship in Environmental Studies: (3.00)

Develops skills related to real-life working situations in major-related field.

GE 208 Introduction to Geology (3.00)

Introduces students to natural science through study of the Earth. Develops student knowledge of geology; notably Earth materials, Earth history, topography, tectonics, fossil fuels, groundwater, and soils. Highlights social and ethical issues.

GE 209 Introduction to Geology Laboratory (1.00)

Introduces students to scientific inquiry through participation in field and laboratory activities. Involves exercises reinforcing lecture content.

MT 270 Introduction to Statistics (3.00)

Presents standard topics in introductory statistics for students whose major is not mathematics. Topics include descriptive statistic, probability distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation and other topics.

Cross listing(s): BA CITI MT 270C.

MT 272 Statistics for the Life Sciences (3.00)

Presents introductory statistics emphasizing application in biology, psychology, neuroscience, and kinesiology. Includes descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, regression, t-tests, Chi-square, and ANOVA with particular emphasis to analysis using p-scores.

Cross listing(s): MT 272C.

MT 370 Intermediate Statistics (3.00)

Introduces stratified sampling and experimental design; one factor ANOVA, two factor ANOVA, -factor ANOVA; selected multiple comparison tests; multiple correlation and regression; the sign test; the Mann-Whitney U-test; the runs test; and the Spearman correlation.

Pre-requisite: MT*270 AND MT*272

Cross listing(s): BA 370 PY 370.

MT 470A Mathematical Statistics I (3.00)

Introduces probability; distribution functions and moment generating functions, correlation and regression; development and applications of binomial, normal, student's T, chi square, and F distributions.

Pre-requisite: MT*360B

Cross listing(s): MT 472.

RT 401E Eco-Theology (3.00)

Explores contemporary environmental issues from the perspectives of different religious traditions. Compares spiritual and religious views of the environment, its meaning, and its relation to human beings. Explore scientific understandings of contemporary environmental issues, asking how religions engage these issues. NOTE: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

Pre-requisite: TAKE RT*201 OR RT*201C;

Cross listing(s): CAS 411 ENVS 411.

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