It's Not Just Another Intro Class

Writing Analytically is the first seminar course of your First Year Experience at Regis. Your First Year Experience consists of a fall writing seminar (Writing Analytically) that is linked with a spring communication-intensive seminar (C Course). Seminar sections are limited to 17 entering students, and are taught by faculty from different academic disciplines. You will take both courses in what is known as a cohort - meaning you will be in both classes with the same group of students as a continuation of the writing and communication experience.

Although topics vary from section to section (see below), all focus on Eloquentia Perfecta, the classical Jesuit emphasis on critical reading, thinking, and writing, which are central elements of the college learning process.The seminar also serves as an orientation to college life and addresses transitional issues of first-year students. The seminar faculty instructor serves as each student’s academic advisor until the student declares a major.

Take a peek at the course titles below, and dive into the descriptions. This isn't your average class. Excited? Once you've narrowed down your top three choices complete the online advising form so we can start planning your very first semester of college at Regis University. It's going to be great!

Course Descriptions

Writing for Social Justice

Note: This section (En/Route) requires a year-long service learning component, for which students will receive an additional credit hour both semesters.

In this section of Writing Analytically, we will focus on writing which practices being for and with others through social observation, analysis and advocacy. We will approach this theme in two ways: first, by means of weekly fieldwork at a Denver program or agency seeking to address basic human needs and to promote justice; and, second, by means of reading, reflection, discussion, and writing at Regis University. Our goal in taking a double approach is to trace the connections between academic life at Regis and life in and beyond the city of Denver. For more information on this section, visit enrouteregis.org

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Jason Taylor, Assistant Professor
Philosophical Explorations
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m
Becky Vartabedian, Term Instructor
Philosophical Explorations
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m
Lara Shamieh, Assistant Professor
Speaking to Make a Difference


Big Bangs in Twentieth Century Music

In this course, we will focus on Western musical developments in the twentieth century, which was a period of enormous change. Our topics for discussion will include the differences between listening to live and recorded music, the riot at the premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, the phenomenon of Beatlemania, and various controversial topics in contemporary music.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Loretta Notareschi, Assistant Professor
American Musical Theater


Commitment Writing Analytically

How We Live

Note: First Year Commitment students only. Service learning component required

In this course, we will seek to explore who we are and the worlds we inhabit. Our medium for exploration will be the essay, one of the most versatile forms of writing. Through reading and writing essays on topics ranging from identity and immigration, to love and language, to science and sports, to pop culture and haute couture, we will discover and define what it means to live in America today and begin to answer the essential question of the Regis mission, How ought we to live?

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Cynthia Kolanowski, Assistant Director, Commitment Program
RCC 200B: The Search for Meaning
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m
Daryl Palmer, Professor 
RCC 200B: The Search for Meaning
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m
David Hicks, Professor 
RCC 200B: The Search for Meaning


Chinese Food Culture in America

Note: This section is not recommended for science/pre-health majors due to lab conflicts.

This course focuses on the role that Chinese cuisine has played in the development of society, culture, and identity in the United States over the past 150 years.  It examines the history of Chinese cuisine in China as well as foreign encounters with Chinese cuisine in China from the perspectives of both Europeans and Chinese-Americans.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
TR, 9:25 - 10:40 a.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Michael Chiang, Assistant Professor
Religion and the Human Quest


Civil and Human Rights

Slavery, foot binding, child labor, women's suffrage, genocide, land mines, Apartheid, trafficking of women ... just a few among many examples of the world's concern for human and civil rights. How does an ideal become part of a global movement to extend universal human right? We'll examine this movement's lessons for other causes. This is an ideal course for pre-law students!

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Daniel Wessner, Chair & Professor
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Colorado and the Civil Rights Movement - El Movimiento

Colorado was a hotbed of civil rights activity in the 1960s and 1970s.  Activists contributed in many ways to the Chicano Civil Rights Movement, “El Movimiento.”  We will explore this movement and will participate in events associated with the exhibit at History Colorado Center.  We will examine how events and participants of this movement have been remembered through academic discourse, guest speakers, and museum exhibits.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Nicki Gonzales, Associate Professor
History of the United States Since 1865


Communication, Prison, and Social Justice

In an effort to understand the prison population expansion over the last forty years, this course examines the impact of the war on drugs, the schools-to-prison pipelines, the militarization of law enforcement, and the representation of crime and criminality in popular culture on the criminal justice system at-large.  One of the many problems this course hopes to address is the fact that 96% of these prisoners will be released back into our communities without having been offered many—and in some cases any—rehabilitative services. They will exit prison bitter, lonely, and unskilled; this explains in part why the formerly-incarcerated are so likely to commit further crimes (nationally, the recidivism rate hovers above 70%; see the data posted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics).  It is our charge to examine how these issues impact our communities.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Nicki Gonzales, Associate Professor
Speaking to Make a Difference


Conflict Transformation

Conflict can be scary, sometimes even fatal, but it doesn’t have to be.  In this section of RCC 200, you’ll write about how we can transform conflict into something more humane and just, and we’ll do so in contexts that range from the interpersonal to the international.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Geoffrey Bateman, Assistant Professor
Religion and the Human Quest


Critical Media Studies

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

This course explores the role of contemporary media in shaping our sense of ourselves and our world. The class surveys a broad array of critical approaches to understanding media.  To accomplish this critical objective, and to facilitate our departmental mission and goals, this course utilizes contemporary critical theory to assist students in understanding the complex role of mass media (film, television, advertising, print, sound and new media) in society. Students are introduced to six different critical perspectives, which are organized according to their emphasis on media industries, messages, or audiences. The central aim of this course is to transform students into critical citizens.  It is, thus, imperative we examine contemporary film, television programs, websites, and music to accomplish this goal.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Ian Dawe, Term Instructor
Music of the Twentieth Century


Finding Meaning in Place

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

This RCC course will explore the ways in which we connect with a physical space. Through course readings, we will explore what it means to feel a deep connection to a certain location, and articulate the ways in which these spaces help shape our own personal narratives. Why do we return to the same spot along the river to find inspiration? What is it about our favorite corner of the library that makes us feel so comfortable there? Students will be responsible for finding their own “place,” on campus or elsewhere, and complete a short journal assignment in that same location once a week to explore these concepts. We will read literary works by authors who have grappled with this same question and attempt to unravel how our connection to physical places affects who we are.


Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Alison Peters, Term Instructor
Religion and the Human Quest



Food Fights

The issues we will explore concern anyone who likes food. Our readings will range widely and will treat everything from agribusiness to home gardens, from vegetarianism to hunting, from food surpluses to famine and poverty. You will read, research, and write critically about cultural practices and contemporary controversies (political, environmental, ethical) in the production and consumption of food, and together we will consider how these shape our answers to the question of how we ought to live.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Frank McGill, Assistant Professor
Literature Matters


From Fidel to Hip Hop

We will consider a variety of texts in this class, from the visual to the written, with a focus on the Cuban Revolution uniting these materials. We will consider speeches, political cartoons, films, music, food, poetry, and blogs.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Martina Will de Chaparro, Term Instructor
Speaking to Make a Difference



Honors Writing Analytically

The Idea of a University (Note: Honors students only)

Our seminar has three related goals.  First, by writing in and out of class, in a variety of forms, you will grow as a college writer.  Second, through historical and creative study of ways and places of knowing, we invite you to envision a place—your place—in the vast and ever-changing academy of knowledge known as the university.   Third, by treating that study as a practice of conversation and collaboration, we mean to promote a “community-of-learners” approach to academic inquiry that will enrich your experience in the Honors Program and throughout your Regis College career.

Days/Times Instructor Spring Course
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Lara Narcisi, Associate Professor 
RCC 300H Honors Seminar: Tradition and Innovation
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m
Mark Bruhn, Department Chair and Professor
RCC 300H Honors Seminar: Tradition and Innovation
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m
Thomas Howe, Assistant Professor
RCC 300H Honors Seminar: Tradition and Innovation


Language Games

Note: This section is not recommended for science/pre-health majors due to lab conflicts.

Less than 1% of the total number of words in the English language accounts for approximately 60% of the language we use. And the smallest of these words tell the stories of our lives—who we believe ourselves to be, what we desire, what we fear. Words like for, is, it. These words are an invisible script in which we write our identities. In this class, we will explore what our words say about us. What are the stories they tell? What do they reveal or conceal? In what way is language a game we play in order to make sense of our experience? How might we write new stories for ourselves by playing the game differently?

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
TR, 1:45 - 3 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Nick Myklebust, Assistant Professor
Literature Matters



Let Your Life Speak

What are your talents, interests, and passions? How do you feel called to serve the world around you? And how might Jesuit education contribute to your sense of calling? This seminar will explore the idea of “vocation” as a calling to use your talents and passions in service of others. We will also learn about distinctively Jesuit ways of discerning vocation within the context of core education at Regis.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Kari Kloos, Associate Professor
Speaking to Make a Difference


Life Stories

Note: This section requires a service learning component

In this class, we examine the ways that our values, goals, and activities connect to construct a story about who we are. We also examine the ways that our stories intersect with the stories of others, and we discern the responsibilities this entails.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Abigail Gosselin, Associate Professor
Philosophical Explorations

Maker Space

Note: The second section below, which takes place in the afternoon, is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

In this writing course we will examine (and participate) in the "Maker" community. What is that, you may ask? Building, crafting, and hacking-- creating objects and design from scratch to better understand our material world. Learn how to ask questions, find answers, and communicate your experience back out to the world. Soldering gun not required, but imagination is.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Morgan Reitmeyer, Assistant Professor
Literature Matters
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Morgan Reitmeyer, Assistant Professor
Introduction to Psychology


Protest, Power, and Social Change

Focusing on history and current social movements we will explore the dynamics of social change.  Protest, music, voting, and journalism are all examples of how power can be challenged. Through research, reflection, and critical writing we will analyze how social change occurs.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Christopher Steele, Term Instructor
Introduction to the American Economy

Stories for Change

From the small world of communicating heartfelt emotions to friends and family, to the larger world of national/international politics and culture, stories change us.  Stories can change a perspective, connect us to others, illustrate who we are and what we believe, make facts come alive, and motivate empathy and action. Together as new college writers we will dig deeper into social issues and discover what moves us as individuals and as a society.  We will practice the everyday, extraordinary art of writing to change the world. “The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way…people look at reality, then you can change it.”  James Baldwin

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Eve Passerini, Associate Professor
Introduction to Sociology


Sustainable Cities

Note: Students in this section should not be planning to major in Biology, Physics, Chemistry, or Math since they will need to take a different MT course for these majors.

How one views city life often depends on how distant from it one is. Those who experience it on a regular basis might see the convenience of having all their needs met in a close proximity. Those who rarely experience city life might see it as dirty and dark and dangerous. This course looks at the evolution of the city—from growth, to suburban flight, to re-vitalization—by offering a hands-on approach to evaluating and writing about the good, the bad, and the ugly aspects of city life.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
John Hickey, Associate Dean
Introduction to Statistics


The Climbing Life

Living in Colorado or near the mountains, we've created our own vocabulary such as “bagging a 14er” or “skinning into the backcountry for a hut trip.” This class will read, write and participate in various forms of the climbing life that are inscribed into many facets of mountain life. We will encounter classical and contemporary naturalist literature from the likes of John Muir and Jon Krakauer, as well as religious ascetics like Thomas Merton. We will analyze various documentaries and movies with romantic and tragic views on climbing. We will also break free of the traditional classroom by going out and hiking in our nearby mountains. In the end, the experiences in this class are designed equip us to become engaged readers and effective writers within our local Rocky Mountain world. So please come with an engaged mind and sense of adventure.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Aaron Conley, Term Faculty
Religion and the Human Quest



The Revolution and Evolution of Hip-Hop

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

Focusing on the history, origins, and movements within this influential cultural revolution, this course invites students to explore the power of this multicultural, multiethnic art movement that influence every corner of our planet.  Among the issues to be discussed are rap, graffiti, break dancing, race, sexism, and heterosexism. Furthermore, we will use the hip-hop revolution as a mechanism for developing essential writing skills.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Brian Drwecki, Assistant Professor
American Musical Theater


Trains and Change

Railroads shaped the development of the American west, including Denver; in the late 19th century, dozens of railroad lines met here.  While most long-distance travel is now by air, trains and train travel are still uniquely captivating to many people.  Denver is now becoming a railroad town in a new way, with light rail lines to near the Regis campus and to the airport opening soon.  This seminar will explore topics in the past, the present, and the future of railroading from historical and technological perspectives.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Frederick Gray, Associate Professor
TBA



Understanding Self and Other

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

Every day I when I open my eyes as I wake up, I think, “Here I am again!” Then I think, “What is that I that I am? Who is looking out?” And at whom? I wonder, when I see the first other person I see that day, whether a roommate or teacher or anyone else. We are all mysteries, in our way, but it is beneficial to try to figure out who and what we are. That’s what we’ll be doing in this class: reading work that addresses these issues—What is a Self? What is an Other?--and writing essays to explore possible answers and ask even more possible questions.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MWF 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Martin McGovern, Assistant Professor
Philosophical Explorations


What Makes a Classic?

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

Classics of literature, film, art, and music can be timeless (Shakespeare) or instant (Harry Potter), universal (hero’s journey) or cult (Rocky Horror).  In this course you will select a classic (one that you love!) and write about its cultural significance.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor Spring "C-Course"
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Michael Ennis, Director, Writing Center
Speaking to Make a Difference


MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.